Testing, fixing

The “Bugs” Time

I am sure most of you are familiar with what a bug is in software. If not, we can tell you they are the most nasty type of “bugs”, because they tend to be expensive and hard to “exterminate”. When and why do we deal with bugs, you may ask?

Well, we deal with bugs at the end of a production cycle. Whenever a product reaches one of the final stages, fixing things that don’t work or correcting things that are not done right is know as bug-fixing period and in some cases “Hell”. That is because some projects which are not managed correctly, can end up in a situation when they need major extended fixes and the bug-fixing will take more than the actual developing process. And that is usually very, very expensive. That is what makes the products to be postponed most of the time. In the rest of the industries, this is called the Quality Assurance period and it is a very important period…

Strange enough, in games industry the QA period is usually not considered so important. For some reason, most of the industry looks at it like this – “Well, there shouldn’t be any major bugs”. This approach may kill a product.  For a mobile game that has a very short life-spawn on a device, a major bug means a hit under the belt. Knock-out. That person who discovers that an app does not work , he/she will uninstall it immediately.

As a result, we have budgeted some serious QA time. This means more than 30% of the budgeted time for the actual development. Because it is not enough to have a fun product. You need it to function as intended as well.

Angry producer

As you can see, our producer is getting really stressed about it…